The Catholic University of America

RESUMES
 

 

GENERAL RESUME

  • General Resume

    PURPOSE: A document used to convince employers to interview you for an internship, full-, part-time position, or work study or summer job. It highlights your education, skills, experience, and achievements. View the complete handout here.

    • Basics to Include

    Contact Information: Name, Mailing Address, Phone, and Email.

    If applicable, consider listing two separate addresses:

    ♦Local – your on- or off-campus address in the D.C. area
    ♦Permanent Address – In most cases, it’s your family address.

     

    Education: Degree in your major (if applicable, list your concentration), minor, graduation date.

    •The official name of school and its location (City, State)
    •G.P.A.: List if 3.0 and above
    •Honors: List if you received Dean's List, scholarships, honors societies, special awards

     

    Relevant Coursework:

    ♦List 4-5 upper level courses; course numbers should be removed; omit any introductory courses.

     

    Study Abroad: (if applicable):

    •List full name of institution, City, Country, Dates

     

    Experience: Paid or unpaid. List internships, summer positions, on- and off-campus employment.

    →Each entry will include job title, the name of the organization, the organization’s location (city, state), and dates of employment. When listing your job responsibilities and accomplishments, use action verbs.

    Activities: Clubs/Organizations, Sports, etc. (List any leadership positions you held). Include dates of participation.

    →Community Service (can also be called “Volunteer Work”): Name of Organization (List any leaderships positions you held), Location (City, State). Include dates of participation.

    Skills: Computer, Language(s), Social Media (optional but can be helpful for certain fields and positions)

    Other Sections To Consider:

    ♦Publications
    ♦Presentations
    ♦Memberships

    ♦Certifications

  • • Types of Resumes

    Chronological

    The most commonly used type of resume. Your information is arranged in reverse chronological order (i.e. most recent first). When in doubt, use the chronological resume.

    Use if you:

    ♦are applying for an internship, an entry-level, mid-level, or executive level position.
    ♦are applying for graduate, medical, or law school.
    ♦are seeking a job in a career field where you have gained some experience.
    ♦want to highlight your last place of employment.
    ♦have little to no previous experience (work and/or internships).
     
     

    Functional

    Instead of arranging your information in date order, emphasis is placed on your skill set, qualifications and related achievements.

    Use if you:

    •are changing careers.
    •want to highlight your abilities and transferable skills.
    •have a variety of experiences that do not point to your target job or internship.
    •have gaps in employment or frequently changed jobs.
    •want to take the focus away from your places of employment.
     

    Combination

    This resume combines the chronological and functional resume formats. It emphasizes your skill set and draws attention away from your lack of experience in the field. At the same time, it maintains the chronological format that the majority of employers still prefer.
     
    Use if you:
     
    •are looking to change careers.
    •want to immediately emphasize your strongest credentials.
    •are an experienced professional with an extensive work history.
    •are considering re-entry in the job market.
  • • Length

    Your resume should be no more than 1-page. An employer spends an average of 20 seconds reviewing your resume. Helpful hints to stay within 1 page:

    ♦Margins should be set between 1” and .5” on all 4 sides of the page.
    ♦Font size: 12-, 11- or 10-point font. Do not go smaller than 10-point, or it becomes difficult for employers to read.
    ♦Font style: Use an easy-to-read font. Examples include Times New Roman, Calibri, or Arial.
    ♦Keep it simple: Avoid using tables, lines, shading, or graphs.
     
  • • Do's & Don'ts of Resume Writing

    Do

    Include your high school information through your sophomore year of college. Juniors and seniors should remove it.
     
    Use the correct verb tense.

    •If a position is current, use present tense. If it is a job or activity you completed, use past tense.

    Use action verbs.
    •An action verb packs a lot of information in one word. Also, do not use an action verb more than once. Use a variety to hold the reader’s interest.  (See sample action verbs.)
     
    Use a bulleted format.

    •While it takes up more space, it’s easier for the employer to skim and review your information.

    Take the time to create a targeted resume. Spend some time reading the position description, highlighting any keywords and phrases. Incorporate them into your resume to illustrate how your experience clearly lines up with their position.

    Check for spelling and grammar errors. Spellcheck is not enough. Proofread it multiple times. A simple misspelling or grammar error can cost you an interview.

    ♦Contact Career Services for assistance on your resume. We offer 2 ways to assist you:

    Schedule a 1-on-1 appointment to meet with a professional career counselor. No email requests, please. Call (202-319-5623) or drop by (102 McMahon Hall) the office.
     
    Stop by for Walk-In Hour. Check the career services website – https://careers.cua.edu -- for the time and days.

     

    Don't

     

    >Do not simply use paid employment or work history to list your experiences. Instead, use the title “Experience” because it allows for more flexibility. Experiences can be paid or unpaid.

    >Do not use personal pronouns (I or me) when describing your experiences.

    >Do not use complete sentences when describing your job responsibilities. Concentrate on on using action verbs to emphasize your responsibilities/skills. A sample list is provided.

    >Do not keep using the same action verb.  Your reader will quickly grow disinterested.

    >Do not use a resume template. It is difficult to work with if you want to change, move, or delete categories. It also gives a cookie cutter appearance.

    >Do not include the line References Available Upon Request at the bottom of your resume. Instead, create a separate reference sheet.  Instructions are provided.

  • • Writing a Winning Job Description

    A winning job description goes into more detail to effectively highlight your accomplishments. Use ACTION WORDS ato create a concise statement that expands what you did and the results you achieved.

    OK

    ♦Updated Facebook Page
    ♦Organized charity event

     

    BETTER

    ♦Managed content of company's social media platforms, including Facebook and Twitter feeds. Developed company's first mobile application.
    ♦Organized local charity event, raising $1,000 for new hospital wing.

     

    ⇒Action Verbs 

     

  • • How To Write A Reference Page

    References available upon request.

    The line "References available upon request" is outdated and no longer used. Instead, create a separate reference page and submit it with your resume.

    When do I ask?

     
    Before you submit your resume to an employer or with your application to graduate school.
    →First, obtain permission from your references before you list them on your resume. Do not assume they will say yes.

     

    Whom do I ask?

     

    Someone who knows & can speak knowledgeably about the quality of your work, i.e. your work performance, reliability, interaction with others, communication skills..

    ♦College Professors or High School Teachers (Do not use a high school teacher after your sophomore year of college).
    ♦Supervisors – from an internship, full- or part-time job, summer job, or work study
    ♦Coach or Club Advisor
    —If someone is not listed above but you’d like to list this person as a reference, ask Career Services for guidance.

    Typically, a family member, family friend, or neighbor should not be used as a reference.  These individuals are referred to as character references, not professional references.

    What Do I Include?

     
    •Person’s name
    •Job Title
    •Professional relationship to you
    •Name of Organization
    •Mailing Address

    •Phone Number and Email Address

     

    How many should I include?

    Check the job announcement for instructions, but if none are given:

    ⇒A good rule of thumb is a minimum of 3, but no more than 5

     

    Other Information To Know

    •Take the time to develop a relationship with your professors, supervisors, coaches, etc.
    •Include your contact information on the reference page so employers can reach you.

    •Keep your references in the loop. Update them of your job-search process or the progress of your graduate school application.

     

    References for Catherine Cardinal
    128 Upshur Lane, Washington, DC 201XX
    (202) 333-XX56
    68example@cardinalmail.cua.edu
    www.linkedin.com/catherinecardinal

     

    Professor Jane Doe, PhD
    Relationship: Professor for 2 English classes, including senior seminar
    English Department, Summit University
    1228 Main Street
    Springfield, NY 22211
    (201) 888-9999
    jdoe08@summit.edu

     

    Ms. Mary G. Smith
    Relationship: Internships Supervisor
    Lead Marketing Analyst, Time Warner, Inc.
    825 Avenue of the Americas, Suite 100
    New York, NY 11101
    (212) 111-2222
    maryg.smith@time_warninc.com

     

    Father John Brown
    Relationship: Advisor for Youth Parish Group
    Associate Pastor, St. Michael's Parish
    228 Elm Branch Way
    Greenville, NJ 00808
    (302) 445-6678
    fatherbrown@stmichaels.org

     

  •  

 

 

ENGINEERING RESUME

  • Engineering Resume

    (for students earning their Bachelor’s degrees) An engineering resume contains some unique features specific to your field. For basic guidelines, refer to the general resume section.

    • Objective

    In the interest of space, an objective is not necessary.

    For Example:

    >Objective: To Obtain an entry level position in mechanical engineering.

    •If you are submitting an application for this kind of position, why have an objective in the first place?

    •It's already understood.

  • • Length

    1 Page: In a competitive job market, your resume receives a 20-30 second glance.

    ♦Employers do not have time to read more than 1 page.

  • • Describing Your Experience

    Reverse Chronological Order.

    List your most recent experience first. From there, work your way backwards.
     
     

    Verb Tense

    ♦Present vs. Past

    ⇒When describing a job or internship's responsibilities, and it is still occurring, use present tense.
    ⇒If you completed the position, use past tense.
     
     

    Action Verbs, not complete sentences or paragraphs.

    ♦Omit personal pronouns (I, you, me, my, their, they're) and, "a", "an", and "the" to achieve a concise style that will be easier--and faster--for employers to read.

     

    Bulleted Statements

    •Although it takes up more space, it's quicker for the employer to read.

     

    Engineering Terminology

    •Emphasize skills learned and tasks completed.

     

    Know when it's appropriate to Edit

    →For less relevant experience, list it towards the end of your resume.

    •In some cases, you can condense or even omit it.
    Consult a career counselor for more direction
     
     

    Engineering and Related Technology

    Aided Analyzed Assisted
    Authored AutoCAD Built
    C++ Calculated Charted
    Computed Conceptualized Created
    Designed Developed Devised
    Diagnosed Drafted Drew
    Engineered Evaluated Excavated
    Expedited Forecasted Formulated
    Graphed Illustrated Implemented
    Junior Design Project Mapped MATLAB
    Modeled Operated Overhauled
    Oversaw Processed Programmed
    Remodeled Renovated Repaired
    Restored Restructured Revamped
    Scheduled Senior Design Project Supplied
    Surveyed Translated Wrote
 

 

NURSING RESUME

  • Nursing Resume

    (for undergraduate students earning their BSN) A nursing resume contains some unique features specific to your field. For basic guidelines, refer to the general resume section.

    • Objective

    In the interest of space, an objective is not necessary.

    For Example:

    ⇒Objective: To Obtain a student nurse internship position for the summer.

    •If you are submitting an application for this kind of position, why have an objective in the first place?

    •It's already understood.

     

  • • Length

    1 Page: In a competitive job market, your resume receives a 20-30 second glance.

    •Employers do not have time to read more than 1 page.

     

  • • Describing Your Experience

    Reverse Chronological Order.

    List your most recent experience first. From there, work your way backwards.
     
     

    Verb Tense

    Present vs. Past

    ⇒When describing a job or internship's responsibilities, and it is still occurring, use present tense.
    ⇒If you completed the position, use past tense.
     
     

    Action Verbs, not complete sentences or paragraphs.

    ♦Omit personal pronouns (I, you, me, my, their, they're) and, "a", "an", and "the" to achieve a concise style that will be easier--and faster--for employers to read.

     

    Bulleted Statements

    •Although it takes up more space, it's quicker for the employer to read.

     

    Nursing Terminology

    →Emphasize skills learned, types of patients you interacted with, and tasks completed.

     

  • • Nursing-Related Terminology

     

    Administer Medications (under supervision of RN) Assist Patients with using facilities Bathing Patients
    Blood Draw Blood Pressure Blood Transfusions
    Catheterizations Changing Bed Sheets/Bedpans Clinical Rotations
    Counseling Patients EKG Family Education
    Heart Monitor IV's Medical History
    Nutritional Assessment Patient Education Patient Exams
    Patient Transfers Physical Assessment Shadow Medical Staff
    Sterilization Techniques Sutures Therapeutic Communication
    Total Patient Care Vital Signs Wound Care

     

 

 

SOCIAL WORK RESUME

  • Social Work Resume

    A social work resume has some unique features specific to the field. For basic guidelines, refer to the general resume section.

    • Length

    1 page but no more than 2 pages.

     

  • • Professional Interests

    •Place at the beginning of your resume. It serves as a quick snapshot, and should be only 2-3 key points. Anything longer, and the reader could lose interest.

    Examples include:

    ♦Clinical social work with individuals dual diagnosed with mental illness and alcohol/drug addiction.
    ♦Create, facilitate, and lead group therapy sessions.
    ♦Macro social worker with an emphasis in program development and research methodology. Focus on children, adolescents, and families.

     

  • • Describing Your Experience

    Use Action Verb phrases, not Complete Sentences

    (See below for the list of social work related skills ). Omit personal pronouns and, “a,”, “an,” and “the” to achieve a concise style that will be easier and faster for employers to read.
     
     

    Use Keywords and Details appropriate to your Audience

    For Clinical Positions – emphasize your clinical skills.
     
    ♦Include details about your client population such as diagnoses or presenting issues, age (children vs. adults vs. older adults), ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.
    ♦Other details may include the number of clients seen individually or in groups, and the length of the type of treatment.
     
    For Macro-Level Positions
    Stress your experience in:
     
    •supervising others
    •program development
    •community organizing
    •fundraising
    •grant writing
    •teamwork
    •budget management.
     
    ⇒Include details such as the number of people you’ve supervised or amount of money raised.

     

    Know when it's appropriate to Edit

    For less relevant experience, list it towards the end of your resume.

    —In some cases, you can condense or even omit it.
    Consult a career counselor for more direction

     

  • • Social-Work Related Skills

    Budgeting

    Clinical Work with:

    Individuals/Groups Families Couples
    Children/Teens Homeless Populations Aging Populations
    Ethnic Populations Victims of Domestic Violence Abused and Neglected Children
    Incarcerated Individuals Clients with Eating Disorders Clients with Development Disabilities
    Clients with Mental Disorders Cognitive Mapping Collaboration
    Community Organizing/Support Building Conducting Connecting
    Coordinating Counseling Court Reporting
    Crisis Intervention Diagnosis Discharge Planning
    Documenting Educating Evaluating
    Facilitating (workshops) Follow Up Fundraising
    Goal Setting Grant Writing Home visits
    Hospital Social Work Implementing Initiating Projects
    Interagency Liaison Job Designing Leading Others
    Listening (active) Lobbying Managing
    Marketing Mediating Mirroring
    Modeling Motivating Negotiating
    Neighborhood Development Persuading Personnel Recruitment and Selection
    Play Therapy Policy Development Presenting
    Program Design/Development/Management Public Relations Public Speaking
    Recruiting Referrals Reframing
    Reinforcing Research Reviewing
    School Social Work Supervising Structuring
    Summarizing Teaching Training
    Treatment Plans (Development of) Visual Imagery Writing

     

  • • Sample Resumes

 

 

EDUCATION (TEACHING) RESUME

  • Education (Teaching) Resume

    A teaching resume contains some unique features specific to your field. For basic guidelines, refer to the general resume section.

    • Objective

    In the interest of space, an objective is not necessary.

    For Example:

    ♦Objective: To Obtain an entry-level position in secondary education.

    —If you are submitting an application for this kind of position, why have an objective in the first place?

    It's already understood.

  • • Length

    ♦1 Page: In a competitive job market, your resume receives a 20-30 second glance.

    •Employers do not have time to read more than 1 page.

     

  • • Describing Your Experience

    Reverse Chronological Order.

    List your most recent experience first. From there, work your way backwards.
     
     

    Verb Tense

    Present vs. Past

    ♦When describing a job or internship's responsibilities, and it is still occurring, use present tense.
    ♦If you completed the position, use past tense.
     
     

    Action Verbs, not complete sentences or paragraphs.

    Omit personal pronouns (I, you, me, my, their, they're) and, "a", "an", and "the" to achieve a concise style that will be easier--and faster--for employers to read.

     

    Bulleted Statements

    •Although it takes up more space, it's quicker for the employer to read.

     

    Teaching Terminology

    •Emphasize skills learned and tasks completed.

     

    Know when it's appropriate to Edit

    For less relevant experience, list it towards the end of your resume.

    —In some cases, you can condense or even omit it.
    —Consult a career counselor for more direction
     
  • Teaching-Related Terminology (for use in a resume, cover letter or interview)

     
    Action Research Paper Assessment Tools Audiovisual Learning Techniques
    Balanced Literacy Child-Centered Classroom Management
    Community Participation Cooperative Learning Counseled
    Curriculum Development Differentiated Instruction Different Learning Styles
    Diverse Learning Styles English as a Second Language (ESL) English Language Learners (ELL)
    Gifted and Talented Guided Reading Hands-on Learning/Experiences
    Individualized Education Program (IEP) Instructed Interactive Learning
    International Baccalaureate Program (IBP) Lesson Planning Modified Instruction
    Multi-Cultural Instruction Multiple Intelligences Multi-Sensory Instruction
    Parental Involvement Parent-Teacher Conference Small and Large Group Instruction
    Special Needs Standardized Testing Students with Disabilities
    Teaching Portfolio Teaching Styles/Methods Team Teaching
      Thematic Unit  
  • • Sample Resumes

 

 

CURRICULUM VITAE

  • Curriculum Vitae

    The C/V is a critical element of the job search.

  • • Objective

    •It should be a complete summary of your educational and professional experience as it relates to the types of positions for which you will be applying. —Keep in mind, however, that every discipline has specific c/v format requirements.

    ♦To find out the appropriate format within your field of study, consult with several faculty members in your academic department.

     

    ⇒Before you begin writing your c/v , think about what you want to communicate about yourself to potential employers.

    →Consider your educational background, your interests and skills, and your aspirations.

    •This will assist you in not only identifying organizations and positions of interest, but also in tailoring your c/v to specific job leads.
     
  • • Guidelines For Organizing Your C/V

    ♦All information on your c/v should be relevant to the type(s) of positions to which you will be applying. Depending on your background and experience, several pages may be necessary depict your credentials accurately and completely.

    ⇒Generally speaking, c/v's are typically 2 pages, 3 pages at most.

    ⇒However, some disciplines may require a more detailed c/v , which may range from 4-12 pages.

    •One thought to keep in mind...Quality Before Quantity!

  • • Categories Appropriate for the Vita

     
    Academic Preparation Teaching Overview Academic Service
    Teaching Interests Thesis Academic Training
    Experience Summary Professional Service Academic Interests
    Research Interests Academic Background Experience Highlights
    University Involvement Comprehensive Areas Educational Background
    Research Overview Faculty Leadership Professional Interests
    Dissertation Title Educational Overview Administrative Experience
    Committee Leadership Professional Studies Consulting Experience
    Departmental Leadership Scholarships Professional Competencies
    Degrees Continuing Education Leadership & Activities
    Awards Course Highlights Special Honors Proficiencies
    Academic Accomplishments Foreign Study Professional Experience
    Distinctions Areas of Knowledge Professional Achievements
    Study Abroad Professional Overview Honors and Awards
    Areas of Expertise Career Achievements Teaching Experience
    College Activities Publications Background
    Language Competencies Scholarly Publications Professional Certification
    Dossier Scholarly Works Scholarly Presentations
    Internships Certificates Credentials
    Books Conference Presentations Special Training References
    Articles/Monographs Workshop Presentations Graduate Practica
    Endorsements Recommendations Reviews
    Workshops and Conventions Exhibits/Exhibitions Programs and Workshops
    Arrangements/Scores Conferences Attended Conference Participation
    Conference Leadership Education Research Experience
    Service Educational Interests Dissertation
    Professional Association Fellowships Educational Highlights
    Principal Teachers Related Experience Travel Abroad
    Professional Background Prizes Career Highlights
    Languages Teaching/Research Licensure Placement File
    Professional Papers Conventions Addresses Graduate Fieldwork
     
  • • Basic Sections To a C/V

    Identification

    ♦Includes your name, address and phone number.

    —Some individuals elect to include their e-mail address, office address and phone number as well.

    ♦If you include this, be sure to clearly identify them as such.
    →Personal information, such as age, gender, race and religious affiliation should not be included on your c/v

    →Not only is it inappropriate, but, in most cases it is illegal for employers to ask you about this information.

    ♦However, as part of the application process, you may receive a form from the INSIGHT Into Diversity to be completed, confidentially, and it will not be included in your application materials.

    Education

    •Includes degrees completed as well as those in progress.

    ⇒Be sure to include the name and location of the institution, major field of study, anticipated graduation date, and dissertation title and an abstract -- in reverse chronological order.
    —You may also include academic honors, awards and scholarships in this section.
     

    Professional Experience

    >You want to list any experience (paid or unpaid) that relates to the positions to which you will are applying.

    ⇒For example, if you're applying for a position that is primarily research focused, you would begin by listing research experience and/or interests.
    •Perhaps you would then list any publications and/or presentations.
    —This may be work you've completed as a professional in the field or as a graduate assistant or fellow.
    •The key question to ask yourself is...Is it relevant? The degree of relevancy will determine where it is located within your c/v

     

    ♦The most important, most relevant information should be positioned towards the beginning of the document.

    ⇒On the other hand, if you're applying for a position that is primarily teaching focused, you would begin by listing teaching experience.

    —Again, this may be work you've completed as a professional and/or work you've completed as a graduate assistant or teaching fellow.

    ♦Other information to include may be memberships/affiliations, volunteer experience, special/additional training, languages, and perhaps a statement regarding your dossier.

     

  • • Sample Content